Föhrenbergkreis Finanzwirtschaft

Unkonventionelle Lösungen für eine zukunftsfähige Gesellschaft

Posts Tagged ‘Too big to fail’

Bank resolution and the structure of global banks

Posted by hkarner - 10. August 2018

Patrick Bolton, Martin Oehmke 01 August 2018, vox.eu

Barbara and David Zalaznick Professor of Business, Columbia University

Associate Professor of Finance, London School of Economics

How should prudential regulators deal with global banks that are ‚too big to fail‘? Many see bank resolution as the key element in dealing with this challenge (FDIC and Bank of England 2012, Financial Stability Board 2014). The main idea is that global systemically important banks (G-SIBs) should issue ‚total loss absorbing capital‘ (TLAC) in the form of subordinated long-term debt or equity. These securities would be issued to absorb losses and recapitalise the institution in resolution, with minimal disruption to the bank’s operations and without public support.

But what should these resolution frameworks look like? More importantly, would they work? Much hinges on this question, given that there are currently around thirty G-SIBs, with total exposures equal to more than 75% of global GDP in 2014.

Global and local

In our recent work (Bolton and Oehmke 2018), we provide a framework to assess the key trade-offs in cross-border resolution of global banks. The main difficulty in designing effective resolution regimes is the mismatch between their global nature and the national scope of the regulators charged with carrying out their resolution.  Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Advertisements

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

ITALIEN IST „TOO BIG TO FAIL“

Posted by hkarner - 24. Mai 2018

FURCHE-Kolumne 241, Wilfried Stadler

Die äußersten Ränder des politischen Spektrums Italiens haben also doch noch einen gemeinsamen Nenner gefunden. Fundamentale Gegensätze der aus völlig konträren weltanschaulichen Biotopen stammenden Verhandlungspartner wurden so lange zurechtgebogen, bis schließlich die ausgeprägte Europaskepsis beider Lager zur einigenden Klammer wurde. Darin spiegelt sich eine durchaus verbreitete Stimmung in der Bevölkerung des einst europafreundlichsten EU-Mitgliedsstaates wieder, nachdem Italien mit seinen nicht weniger als 750.000 Flüchtlingen politisch schmählich im Stich gelassen wurde.

Vor allem aber eint die nationalistische Lega Nord und die anarcho-alternative Fünf-Sterne-Bewegung des Südens der Wunsch, das beengende budgetäre Regel-Korsett der Eurozone los zu werden. Drei Jahre nach der Griechenland-Krise geht es diesmal allerdings um eine Volkswirtschaft ganz anderer Dimension. Italien ist immerhin das Land mit der in absoluten Zahlen nach den USA und Japan drittgrößten Schuldenlast der Welt. Der Anteil der Staatsschulden an seiner Wirtschaftsleistung liegt mit über 130 Prozent bei mehr als dem Doppelten der in den so genannten Maastricht-Regeln vorgeschriebenen Grenze von 60 Prozent. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Studie: Größte US-Banken weiter systemrelevant

Posted by hkarner - 10. Januar 2018

Einige Finanzinstitute seien weiterhin so groß und so vernetzt, dass sie im Fall eines Zusammenbruchs das gesamte Finanzsystem gefährden könnten, sagt die Minneapolis-Fed.

Der US-Notenbank-Ableger von Minneapolis fordert die Behörden auf, die Kapitalvorgaben für die größten amerikanischen Banken zu verschärfen. Trotz etlicher Reformen nach der Finanzkrise 2008 seien diese Geldhäuser immer noch systemrelevant, heißt es in einer am Mittwoch veröffentlichten Studie der Fed-Experten.

Einige Finanzinstitute seien weiterhin so groß und so vernetzt, dass sie im Fall eines Zusammenbruchs das gesamte Finanzsystem gefährden könnten („too big to fail“). Es bestehe immer noch ein Risiko von 67 Prozent, dass die Steuerzahler in den nächsten 100 Jahren für eine Rettung der Kreditinstitute aufkommen müssten. Aus diesem Grund sollten die Kapitalanforderungen für Geldhäuser mit einer Bilanzsumme von mehr als 250 Milliarden Dollar „deutlich“ erhöht werden.  Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Republican Bankruptcy Illusion

Posted by hkarner - 1. August 2016

Photo of Simon Johnson

Simon Johnson

Simon Johnson, a former chief economist of the IMF, is a professor at MIT Sloan, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and co-founder of a leading economics blog, The Baseline Scenario. He is the co-author, with James Kwak, of White House Burning: The Founding Fathers, Our National Debt, and Why It Matters to You.

JUL 31, 2016, Project Syndicate

WASHINGTON, DC – There is now near-unanimity that the United States’ Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation, enacted in 2010, did not end the problems associated with some banks being “too big to fail.” When it comes to proposed solutions, however, no such consensus exists. On the contrary, financial regulation has become a key issue in November’s presidential and congressional elections.

So who has the more plausible and workable plan for reducing the risks associated with very large financial firms? The Democrats have an agreed and implementable strategy that would represent a definite improvement over the status quo. The Republican proposal, unfortunately, is a recipe for greater disaster than the US (and the world) experienced in 2008.

On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton’s campaign materials and the party platform point to a detailed plan to defend Dodd-Frank and to go further in terms of pressing the largest firms to become less complex and, if necessary, smaller. Banks must also fund themselves in a more stable fashion. If Clinton wins, she will draw strong support from Congressional Democrats – including her rival for the Democratic nomination, Bernie Sanders, and his fellow senator, Elizabeth Warren – when she pushes in this direction. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The End of Big Banks

Posted by hkarner - 29. Februar 2016

Photo of Simon Johnson

Simon Johnson

Simon Johnson, a former chief economist of the IMF, is a professor at MIT Sloan, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and co-founder of a leading economics blog, The Baseline Scenario. He is the co-author, with James Kwak, of White House Burning: The Founding Fathers, Our National Debt, and Why It Matters to You.

FEB 29, 2016, Project Syndicate

WASHINGTON, DC – After nearly a decade of crisis, bailout, and reform in the United States and the European Union, the financial system – both in those countries and globally – is remarkably similar to the one we had in 2006. Many financial reforms have been attempted since 2010, but the overall effects have been limited. Some big banks have struggled, but others have risen to take their place. Both before the 2008 global financial crisis and today, just over a dozen big banks dominate the world’s financial landscape. And yet the ground is shifting beneath the financial sector, and big banks could soon become a thing of the past. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Case for Breaking Up Too-Big-To-Fail Banks

Posted by hkarner - 10. Februar 2016

By on February 9, 2016, RGE EconoMonitor dolan-1

The presidential campaign has brought new attention to the problem of banks that are too big to fail (TBTF). As everyone agrees, the largest banks are bigger than ever. As the following chart shows, the share of all bank assets held by the four largest banks rose from 33 percent in 2007 to 41 percent by 2015. Over the same period, the combined assets of the four largest banks, as a share of GDP, grew from 28 percent to 40 percent.

P160125-1

The major candidates disagree, not on whether the largest banks are too big to fail, but on what to do about it. Senator Bernie Sanders has made breaking up the banking giants a centerpiece of his campaign. Hillary Clinton favors a continuation of the regulatory approach embodied in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. The GOP candidates favor an approach that combines deregulation with market discipline.

Sanders’ anger at the banks seems to resonate well with voters, but influential voices in the media skeptical. The Editorial Board of the Washington Post has argued against breaking up the big banks. The New York Times has done likewise, prominently featuring an opinion piece written by Steve Eisman, a managing director of the investment firm Neuberger Berman. Politico also thinks breaking up the banks would be a bad idea. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Why haven’t banking giants got a lot smaller?

Posted by hkarner - 31. Januar 2016

Date: 29-01-2016
Source: The Economist
Subject: Big banks: Chop chop

BOSSES at big banks would once have cringed at releasing the kind of results they have been serving up to investors in recent days. This week, for instance, Deutsche Bank posted a loss of €6.8 billion ($7.4 billion) for 2015. In the third quarter of last year the average return on equity at the biggest banks, those with more than $1 trillion in assets, was a wan 7.9%—far below the returns of 15-20% they were earning before the financial crisis. Exclude Chinese banks from the list, and the figure drops to a miserable 5.7%. Returns have been languishing at that level for several years.

In response, the banks’ top brass are following a similar template: retreats from certain countries or business lines, along with a stiff dose of job cuts. Barclays, which earlier this month said it would eliminate 1,000 jobs at its investment bank and shut up shop altogether in Asia, is typical. More radical measures, such as breaking up their firms into smaller, more focused and less heavily regulated units, do not seem to be on the cards. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Die Sparer und ihr putziger Sicherungstopf

Posted by hkarner - 25. Januar 2016

25.01.2016 | 18:26 | Josef Urschitz (Die Presse)urschitz

Spareinlagen sind sicher – aber de facto haften weiter die Steuerzahler.

Dieser Tage haben zahlreiche Bankkunden ein Schreiben ihres Instituts erhalten. Inhalt: Bekanntlich sei die staatliche Einlagensicherung abgeschafft worden, für die betreffenden Spareinlagen bis zur Obergrenze von 100.000 Euro pro Person und Institut garantiere jetzt die Einlagensicherungsgesellschaft XYZ.

Ein „Presse“-Leser hat besorgt im Firmenbuch nachgeblättert und festgestellt, dass in seinem Fall eine GmbH mit 36.000 Euro Stammkapital bürgt. Für die Spareinlagen des gesamten Sektors. Und das, so meint er, beruhige ihn jetzt nicht rasend, und er frage sich: Gibt es überhaupt noch eine Einlagensicherung?

Schwer zu sagen: Es gibt jedenfalls keinen Topf, aus dem größere Ansprüche befriedigt werden könnten. Der wird (für alle Sektoren gemeinsam) 2019 aufgestellt und soll 2024 gefüllt sein. Mit 1,5 Mrd. Euro. Auch das ist nicht wirklich viel, denn die Spareinlagen, für die dieses Töpfchen geradestehen soll, haben in der Zwischenzeit die 200-Milliarden-Euro-Marke überschritten. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Failure at the Financial Stability Board

Posted by hkarner - 30. November 2015

Photo of Simon Johnson

Simon Johnson

Simon Johnson, a former chief economist of the IMF, is a professor at MIT Sloan, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and co-founder of a leading economics blog, The Baseline Scenario. He is the co-author, with James Kwak, of White House Burning: The Founding Fathers, Our National Debt, and Why It Matters to You.

NOV 30, 2015, Project Syndicate

WASHINGTON, DC – At least since the fall of 2008, leading economies’ officials have agreed – in principle – that something must be done about financial firms that are “too big to fail.” Great efforts, including countless international meetings, working papers, and communiqués have been devoted to this end. Earlier this month, the Basel-based Financial Stability Board (FSB) announced, to some fanfare, the completion of a major stage in this project. But the announcement only served to underscore how little progress has been made. The world’s largest banks remain too big to fail, and this is likely to have dire consequences in the near future. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Aufseher legen höheren Kapitalpuffer für Too-big-to-fail-Banken fest

Posted by hkarner - 9. November 2015

9. November 2015, 12:00, derstandard.at

Der Finanzstabilitätsrat hat sich auf neue Regeln für systemrelevante Banken geeinigt. Sie brauchen künftig mehr Eigenkapital

Frankfurt – Die internationalen Bankenaufseher wollen das Finanzsystem besser vor gefährlichen Pleiten von Großbanken schützen. Die 30 wichtigsten Banken der Welt müssen deshalb von 2019 an eine Haftungsmasse von mindestens 16 Prozent ihrer risikogewichteten Bilanzsumme vorhalten, um Verluste abzufedern, wie der Finanzstabilitätsrat der wichtigsten Industrie- und Schwellenländer (G20) am Montag mitteilte.

2022 soll dieser als TLAC-Quote (Total Loss-Absorbing Capacity) bezeichnete Puffer auf mindestens 18 Prozent steigen. Er besteht nicht nur aus Eigenkapital, sondern auch aus Anleihen und anderen Schuldpapieren.

Ende von Too Big To Fail? Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Verschlagwortet mit: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »