Föhrenbergkreis Finanzwirtschaft

Unkonventionelle Lösungen für eine zukunftsfähige Gesellschaft

Posts Tagged ‘Rating’

Italien will 234 Milliarden von Ratingagenturen

Posted by hkarner - 5. Februar 2014

orf.on, 5/2

Italien will von den Ratingagenturen Standard & Poor´s, Moody´s und Fitch eine Entschädigung von 234 Mrd. Euro für die Herabstufung des Ratings im Jahr 2011 verlangen.

Der Rechnungshof erklärte, dass die Agenturen bei dem Downgrade nicht den hohen Wert des historischen, kulturellen und künstlerischen Erbes berücksichtigt hätten, was eine Grundlage von Italiens wirtschaftlicher Kraft darstelle.

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , | Leave a Comment »

Germany’s Coming Downgrade

Posted by hkarner - 18. Dezember 2013

Date: 17-12-2013
Source: Project Syndicate

SYLVESTER EIJFFINGER

Sylvester Eijffinger is Professor of Financial Economics at Tilburg University in the Netherlands.

TILBURG – On December 5, the Dutch celebrate Sinterklaas, a traditional winter holiday that people celebrate by preparing surprises for each other. But this year’s celebration was marred by a surprise that no one wanted: just days before, the credit-rating agency Standard & Poor’s stripped the Netherlands of its coveted triple-A status.

The Dutch government reacted to the downgrade much as France did when it lost its triple-A rating almost two years ago. There is no need for alarm, French officials insisted, because the other two big rating agencies, Moody’s and Fitch, maintained their highest ratings on French sovereign debt. But, earlier this year, France lost its triple-A rating at both Moody’s and Fitch, and S&P downgraded its debt yet again. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Five Years in Limbo

Posted by hkarner - 9. Oktober 2013

Date: 9 Oct 2013
Source: Project Syndicate, Joseph StiglitzStiglitz CC

NEW YORK – When the US investment bank Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008, triggering the worst global financial crisis since the Great Depression, a broad consensus about what caused the crisis seemed to emerge. A bloated and dysfunctional financial system had misallocated capital and, rather than managing risk, had actually created it. Financial deregulation – together with easy money – had contributed to excessive risk-taking. Monetary policy would be relatively ineffective in reviving the economy, even if still-easier money might prevent the financial system’s total collapse. Thus, greater reliance on fiscal policy – increased government spending – would be necessary.

Five years later, while some are congratulating themselves on avoiding another depression, no one in Europe or the United States can claim that prosperity has returned. The European Union is just emerging from a double-dip (and in some countries a triple-dip) recession, and some member states are in depression. In many EU countries, GDP remains lower, or insignificantly above, pre-recession levels. Almost 27 million Europeans are unemployed.

Similarly, 22 million Americans who would like a full-time job cannot find one. Labor-force participation in the US has fallen to levels not seen since women began entering the labor market in large numbers. Most Americans’ income and wealth are below their levels long before the crisis. Indeed, a typical full-time male worker’s income is lower than it has been in more than four decades.

Yes, we have done some things to improve financial markets. There have been some increases in capital requirements – but far short of what is needed. Some of the risky derivatives – the financial weapons of mass destruction – have been put on exchanges, increasing their transparency and reducing systemic risk; but large volumes continue to be traded in murky over-the-counter markets, which means that we have little knowledge about some of our largest financial institutions’ risk exposure. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

A rating agency for Europe – A good idea?

Posted by hkarner - 8. Juli 2013

Bernhard Bartels, Beatrice Weder di Mauro (both from Mainz University), 4 July 2013, voxeu

US-based credit-rating agencies are regularly subject to condemnation for causing or amplifying financial crises – the Eurozone Crisis in particular. Should Europe try to set up a European agency to counter this? This column discusses evidence that shows that the largest German rating agency was more aggressive than the US Big Three both in terms of a lower level and a higher propensity to quickly downgrade Eurozone problem countries.

It is a tough competition for the title of the biggest villain in the recent series of financial crises. Rating agencies, however, are certainly among the leading candidates.
  • Rating agencies have been showered with public anger for causing or at least amplifying the financial crisis in general and the sovereign-debt crisis in particular.
  • In the wake of serial downgrades of European countries some observers suspected a conspiracy of US-based rating agencies and fretted that entire countries were helplessly at the mercy of the mischief of some private rating agency.
  • Even more cool-headed observers mulled over the danger of speculative attacks and self-fulfilling prophesies triggered by hasty, uninformed rating changes.

A European rating agency? Testing for differences Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Euro Boosted by Greece Hope .

Posted by hkarner - 19. Dezember 2012

Have I missed a major decision by the heads of the EZ member states??? Is it really that easy? If yes, it does not qualify the intelligence of the “markets”. (hfk)

Date: 19-12-2012

Source: The Wall Street Journal

The euro reached a seven-month high against the dollar following a five-notch upgrade of Greece by ratings firm Standard & Poor’s, and investors welcomed progress in the U.S. budget negotiations, prompting a rise in stocks.

The euro hit its highest level since May 1 after Standard & Poor’s raised its rating on Greece to B-minus from selective default late on Tuesday.

It is the highest rating S&P has given Greece since June 2011.

The move follows the euro-zone member states’ determination to support Greece’s European Union membership and the Greek government’s commitment to uphold fiscal measures, said S&P. Greek, Italian and Spanish ten-year bond yields also eased, reflecting the relief in the market. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Bertelsmann Stiftung stellt Modell für Rating-Agentur vor

Posted by hkarner - 23. November 2012

Die neue Rating-Agentur der deutschen Stiftung soll etablierten Branchengrößen heftig Konkurrenz machen. Europäische Krisenstaaten würden bei ihr besser abschneiden.

© Chema Moya/EPA/dpa, Zeit.online, 20/11

Kurstafel an der Börse in MadridKurstafel an der Börse in Madrid

Die Bertelsmann Stiftung treibt ihre Pläne für eine internationale Ratingagentur als Gegengewicht zu den drei Marktgrößen voran. In Berlin stellte die Stiftung einen Testlauf vor, bei dem Experten die Kreditwürdigkeit von fünf Staaten bewerteten. In dem alternativen Modell schnitten einige europäische Krisenstaaten besser ab als in den herkömmlichen Ratings.

Die geplante Ratingagentur Incra (International Non-Profit Credit Rating Agency) soll nicht gewinnorientiert arbeiten und eine Alternative zu Moody’s, Fitch und Standard & Poor’s aufzeigen. Den drei Unternehmen wird ein zu großer Einfluss auf die Finanzmärkte in der Euro-Schuldenkrise vorgehalten.

In dem alternativen Rating landete Italien auf Platz drei, nach Deutschland und Frankreich. Im Sommer hatte die Rating-Agentur Moody’s Italien herabgestuft. Damit liegt die Bewertung nur noch zwei Stufen über dem Niveau, das Papiere als spekulative Anlagen ausweist. In dem Bertelsmann-Modell sei die positive Bewertung Italiens den Fähigkeiten des Landes geschuldet, gut mit der Krise umzugehen, hieß es bei der Vorstellung der Ergebnisse. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Did You Know? S&P PIIGS Ratings Edition

Posted by hkarner - 14. Oktober 2012

Author: Rebecca Wilder · October 11th, 2012 · RGE EconoMonitor

With the two-notch downgrade of Spain to BBB- by by S&P (link and link), I figured that this is as good a time as any to start a series called “Did You Know?”. Let’s start with the S&P’s ratings edition and a chart featuring the ratings migration across the periphery economies Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, and Spain (GIIPS).

Did You Know?

Did you know that Ireland and Spain were once rated AAA? For Ireland, Oct 2001 to March 2009; and for Spain, Dec 2004 to Jan 2009.

Did you know that Greece was at one time rated A+? June 2003 to Nov 2004.

Did you know that the average credit quality across the GIIPS is currently BB+? According to S&P rating definitions, that’s below investment grade quality (so-called junk). Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Ratings Cut for Giant Banks

Posted by hkarner - 23. Juni 2012

Date: 22-06-2012
Source: The Wall Street Journal

Moody’s Downgrades Hit Five of Six Largest U.S. Banks, Add to Market Jitters

Moody’s Investors Service dealt a fresh blow to the financial sector, downgrading more than a dozen global banks to reflect declining profitability in an industry being rocked by soft economic growth, tougher regulations and nervous investors.

The move hit five of the six biggest U.S. banks by assets, including Morgan Stanley, which had mounted a campaign to persuade Moody’s not to cut its rating by three notches. It was downgraded instead by two.

The lower ratings are likely to raise the companies’ borrowing costs and affect how they raise capital, and could deprive some banks of trading revenue. The higher costs for banks could be passed on to customers such as municipalities, corporations and others who get loans from banks. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Märkte – helft!

Posted by hkarner - 7. Mai 2012

von Oliver Stock, Handelsblatt.com

07.05.2012, 06:26 Uhr

In Frankreich neigt die neue Regierung zum Geldausgeben. In Griechenland herrscht politisches Chaos. Jetzt werden die Märkte diesen Ländern den Weg weisen.

Oliver Stock ist Chefredakteur von Handelsblatt Online.

Oliver Stock ist Chefredakteur von Handelsblatt Online.

Düsseldorf. Der Euro geht nicht an der Waterkant unter. Deswegen: Sorry, liebe Nordlichter. Um Schleswig-Holstein geht es heute wirklich nicht. Das Schicksal der europäischen Währung und damit auch des europäischen Projekts entscheidet sich in Paris und Athen.

Ein Sozialist führt unser Nachbarland und in Griechenland weiß niemand, wie eine stabile Regierung entstehen soll. Damit hat sich die politische Landkarte verändert. Ein Erdbeben allerdings, bei dem wir alle fürchten müssen, dass unsere Häuser einstürzen, sieht anders aus. Ja, es gab Wahlen. Ja, es gibt Ergebnisse. Mehr aber ist nicht passiert. Mehr würde im Jahr vier nach der Finanzkrise bedeuten, dass eine Großbank zusammenbricht. Dass eine Ratinagentur zu völlig neuen Erkenntnissen kommt. Dass ein Energieversorer seine Kraftwerke nicht mehr im Griff hat. All das aber ist nicht geschehen. Sondern es hat Wahlen gegeben und davon geht die Welt nicht unter. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Ratingagenturen: “Das ist ein politisches Spiel”

Posted by hkarner - 27. April 2012

26.04.2012 | 18:16 | ALEXANDER WEBER UND EVA STEINDORFER (Die Presse)

Ratingagenturen erstellen keine objektiven Urteile, sagt der deutsche Ökonom Karl-Heinz Brodbeck. Je mehr Geld ein Rating bringt, desto besser ist die Note. Der “Presse” erklärt er, wie ein besseres Rating aussieht.

Die Presse: Was stört Sie so sehr an den Ratingagenturen?

Karl-Heinz Brodbeck: Man ist ja schon längst nicht mehr allein, wenn man Ratingagenturen kritisiert. Inzwischen kann die Kritik aber schon sehr konkret werden. Es gibt Untersuchungen, die zeigen, dass die Agenturen nicht einmal ihren ureigensten Aufgaben nachkommen. Zum Beispiel richten sich die Noten nach dem Umsatz. Je mehr Geld die Agenturen mit einem Rating machen, desto besser ist die Note.


Sie spielen auf das System an, bei dem derjenige, der beurteilt wird, auch für die Note bezahlt.

Richtig. Das ist ein ganz wesentlicher Punkt. Das darf auf keinen Fall sein. Eine andere Untersuchung hat gezeigt, dass die Agenturen nicht einmal auf die Informationen zurückgreifen, die uns allen verfügbar sind. Zwei Forscher haben ihre eigenen Einschätzungen auf Basis von Informationen angefertigt, die Sie und ich auch aus dem Internet hätten holen können. Und diese Ratings waren durch die Bank besser als die von Moody’s. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

Posted in Artikel | Getaggt mit: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
Folgen

Erhalte jeden neuen Beitrag in deinen Posteingang.

Schließe dich 432 Followern an