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Posts Tagged ‘Nationalism’

In Europe’s Nationalist Hotbed, Slovakia Takes a Liberal Turn

Posted by hkarner - 2. April 2019

Tanks God! Is this the turn of the tide? The same is happening in Serbia. (hfk)

Date: 01-04-2019
Source: The Wall Street Journal

Zuzana Caputova, an environmental lawyer, is elected as first female president

Zuzana Caputova won an election to become Slovakia’s first female president on Saturday.

Slovakia elected its first female president, a liberal and pro-European anticorruption candidate whose rise is seen as a rebuke of the conservative nationalism remaking its larger neighbors.

Though the role of president in Slovakia is constitutionally limited, the victory of Zuzana Caputova was seen as a striking, if isolated political shift for Central and Eastern Europe, a region of former Communist countries that has been ground zero for a new nationalism spreading on the continent.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban and Poland’s Law and Justice party have each managed to win sweeping majorities in their respective parliaments by promising to keep out Muslim immigrants and entrench Christian conservatism at home. A half dozen candidates made the same pledge during Slovakia’s first-round election, including Ms. Caputova’s chief rival.

In contrast, Ms. Caputova touted her social liberalism as proof that she was different from Slovakia’s political class, which has been inundated with corruption scandals. The environmental lawyer, who came to prominence when opposing the expansion of a landfill in her small town, promoted gay rights in a country with minimal support for same-sex marriage, and argued that Slovakia had some obligation to help its European neighbors by taking in refugees. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Truly Taking Back Control

Posted by hkarner - 26. März 2019

Raghuram G. Rajan, Governor of the Reserve Bank of India from 2013 to 2016, is Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and the author, most recently, of The Third Pillar: How Markets and the State Leave the Community Behind.

When people are more able to shape their own futures, they are less likely to be convinced that others are to blame for their plight. To the extent that it weakens support for virulent nationalism, devolution of global governance to national and local communities may make the world a little more prosperous – and a lot safer.

CHICAGO – Britain is teetering toward Brexit. No one knows what will happen over the next few months. Yet around one-third of British voters support a “no-deal” departure from the European Union, which risks inflicting an economic disaster on the country.

Many of these “no-deal” Brexit supporters are older and modestly educated, and live in economically depressed semi-urban communities and small towns, which tend to be concentrated in northern England. Although they are anxious about the steady deterioration in their economic prospects, studies suggest that trade or even immigration are not their only concerns. Brexiteers also resent their loss of control over policy, first to a distant national capital full of well-educated global elites, and in recent years to an even more remote EU. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Building a Better Nationalism

Posted by hkarner - 14. Februar 2019

Date: 13-02-2019
Source: Foreign Affairs By Yael Tamir

The Nation’s Place in a Globalized World

At a rally in Texas last October, U.S. President Donald Trump was delivering his familiar “America first” message, complaining about “corrupt, power-hungry globalists,” when he tried out a new line: “You know, they have a word—it sort of became old-fashioned—it’s called, ‘a nationalist.’ And I say, ‘Really, we’re not supposed to use that word,’” he added, grinning. “You know what I am? I’m a nationalist, OK? I’m a nationalist.” As the crowd cheered, “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!” Trump nodded. “‘Nationalist’: nothing wrong with it. Use that word!”

As Trump correctly noted, in recent decades, “that word,” and all it suggests, has fallen out of favor. For most political thinkers and elites in the developed West, nationalism is a dangerous, divisive, illiberal impulse that should be treated with skepticism or even outright disdain. Yes, nationalism helped give rise to the modern state system, served as a liberating force in anticolonial independence struggles, and fueled anti-Soviet sentiment during the Cold War. But surely, the thinking went, nationalism was a phase that the rich democracies of the world had outgrown—and in those places where it still thrived, it posed more problems than solutions. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Why Nationalism Works: And Why It Isn’t Going Away

Posted by hkarner - 13. Februar 2019

Date: 12-02-2019
Source: Foreign Affairs By Andreas Wimmer

Nationalism has a bad reputation today. It is, in the minds of many educated Westerners, a dangerous ideology. Some acknowledge the virtues of patriotism, understood as the benign affection for one’s homeland; at the same time, they see nationalism as narrow-minded and immoral, promoting blind loyalty to a country over deeper commitments to justice and humanity. In a January 2019 speech to his country’s diplomatic corps, German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier put this view in stark terms: “Nationalism,” he said, “is an ideological poison.”

In recent years, populists across the West have sought to invert this moral hierarchy. They have proudly claimed the mantle of nationalism, promising to defend the interests of the majority against immigrant minorities and out-of-touch elites. Their critics, meanwhile, cling to the established distinction between malign nationalism and worthy patriotism. In a thinly veiled shot at U.S. President Donald Trump, a self-described nationalist, French President Emmanuel Macron declared last November that “nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism.”

The popular distinction between patriotism and nationalism echoes the one made by scholars who contrast “civic” nationalism, according to which all citizens, regardless of their cultural background, count as members of the nation, with “ethnic” nationalism, in which ancestry and language determine national identity. Yet efforts to draw a hard line between good, civic patriotism and bad, ethnic nationalism overlook the common roots of both. Patriotism is a form of nationalism. They are ideological brothers, not distant cousins. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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The World Needs Europe

Posted by hkarner - 16. Januar 2019

Date: 15-01-2019
Source: Project Syndicate by Jean-Claude Juncker

Jean-Claude Juncker is President of the European Commission.

Having emerged from centuries of bloodshed to become the poster child for integration and collaboration, Europe has a distinct service to offer the rest of the world. With the international order coming apart and populist nationalism on the rise, now is the time for the European Union to show leadership, both at home and abroad.

BRUSSELS – As we usher in a new year, the future direction of the European Union has never been more important, both for Europe and for the rest of the world. In these increasingly tumultuous times, the EU can provide the stability and hope that the world so desperately needs.

For decades, Europe has been the poster child for integration and cooperation in a fractured world. Since the end of World War II, the continent has been living proof that multilateralism works. Europe’s troubled past has given way to a peace spanning seven decades, and to a Union of 500 million citizens living in freedom and prosperity. By any metric, Europe is now the most tolerant, free, and equal place to live anywhere in the world.

But the EU is not a given. Peace is not inevitable, and war is not implausible. The year 2018 marked the centenary of the end of World War I, the lessons of which must still be heeded. The Europeans of 1913 thought that war was impossible, that they were too interlinked to turn on one another. We Europeans have a rich tradition of ignoring premonitions of ruin at our own peril. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Consequences of Downward Trending Growth

Posted by hkarner - 9. Januar 2019

Date: 08-01-2019
Source: YaleGlobal

Investors worldwide worry about numerous shocks that could disrupt the global economy – war, cyberattacks or natural disasters. After a decade of low interest rates that fueled record levels of debt, governments recognize that economic growth is slowing. Other warning signs: Nationalism and populism flourish and threaten cooperative blocs like the European Union, the US-China trade war extends into 2019, political leaders continue deficit-spending without reforms, rising interest rates add to struggles over debt repayment. These trends contribute to uncertainty. Economist David Dapice urges cooperation, warning that nations will find it impossible to reduce risks or meet global challenges on their own “The upside of these problems, even migration and climate change, is that they are amenable to better policy – which does not make those policies popular or easy,” he concludes. “The political class must find a way to be honest with voters and persuade them that what is necessary is reasonable.” – YaleGlobal

Governments contend with debt and sluggish growth; many worldwide risks – known and unknown – could add complications

Multinational solutions for national problems: US traders worry about a falling stock market, and British citizens increasingly express a desire to reverse Brexit

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The Fourth Founding: The United States and the Liberal Order

Posted by hkarner - 13. Dezember 2018

Date: 12-12-2018
Source: Foreign Affairs By Gideon Rose

The United States began as a radical experiment with grandiose ambitions. Its founders believed in Locke’s idea that free individuals could escape the perils of anarchy by joining together and cooperating for mutual benefit—and they created a country to show it wasn’t just talk. The signers of the Declaration of Independence bound themselves in a common political project, establishing a limited government to secure their rights and advance their interests. That act, noted Secretary of State John Quincy Adams in 1821, “was the first solemn declaration by a nation of the only legitimate foundation of civil government. It was the corner stone of a new fabric, destined to cover the surface of the globe.”

From the start, the United States was understood to be both country and cause, a distinct national community and the standard-bearer of a global political revolution. Destiny would take a long time to play out. Until it did, until the surface of the globe was covered with a fabric of democratic republics, the good new country would have to survive in the bad old international system. “Probably for centuries to come,” Adams guessed. So how should the nation behave during the lengthy transition? Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Across Europe, a Political Landscape Defined by Deep Divisions

Posted by hkarner - 12. Dezember 2018

Date: 11-12-2018
Source: The Wall Street Journal By Marcus Walker

Schisms over economics, culture and geography underlie dramas simmering in the U.K., France, Italy and elsewhere

The U.K. government’s pratfalls over Brexit show one thing still unites London with the continent: the growing difficulty of governing Western European nations in which new schisms have made it hard to find a majority for any way forward.

British Prime Minister Theresa May’s decision to delay a parliamentary vote on her withdrawal deal with the European Union, and avoid a humiliating defeat on Tuesday that could have brought her down, sets up the tensest weeks for Brexit since Britons voted to leave the EU in 2016.

Meanwhile, political dramas are also simmering in France, Italy, Germany and Spain. Issues and plotlines differ by country. Despite much-discussed international trends such as the rise of populism, “European politics is and remains, first and foremost, national politics,” says Cas Mudde, a political scientist at the University of Georgia.

Yet the underlying drivers share some resemblance. Divisions over economics, culture and geography are challenging governments’ longevity or their ability to pursue their agenda. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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The Powerlessness of the Most Powerful

Posted by hkarner - 22. Oktober 2018

Oct 20, 2018 Javier Solana, Project Syndicate

Javier Solana was EU High Representative for Foreign and Security Policy, Secretary-General of NATO, and Foreign Minister of Spain. He is currently President of the ESADE Center for Global Economy and Geopolitics, Distinguished Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Europe.

The president of the leading global power has made it clear that he has no interest in getting involved in resolving any of the world’s shared problems, dressing up his foreign policy as one of „principled realism.“ But there is nothing principled or realistic about it.

MADRID – The annual General Debate of the United Nations General Assembly is one of the most notable events on the international diplomatic calendar. As usual, this year’s meeting, during the last week of September, brought together a long list of world leaders, although perhaps the term “world leader” should no longer be used so lightly. The president of the leading global power has made it clear that he has no interest in getting involved in resolving any of the world’s shared problems. Unfortunately, he is not alone.

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The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World

Posted by hkarner - 10. Oktober 2018

Date: 04-10-2018, The Economist
Source: Robert Kagan

We now live in a world:

„Where once people believed that the nation-state was a thing of the past in an increasingly cosmopolitan and interconnected age, we now see nationalism and tribalism reemerging, more than able to hold their own in the brave new world of the Internet.

Meanwhile, a profound and extended crisis of confidence besets the democratic world, even in the birthplace of modern democracy.

Liberal international institutions like the European Union, once considered the vanguard of a postmodern future, are now under assault from without and within.

In America, racial and tribal forces that have always been part of the “subterranean stream” of American history have reemerged to reshape politics and society.

Where thirty years ago the dreams of Enlightenment thinkers going back three centuries seemed to be on the cusp of fulfillment, today a Counter-Enlightenment of surprising potency stirs in Moscow, Budapest, Beijing, Tehran, and Cairo, in parts of Western Europe, and even in the nation that saved liberalism seventy-five years ago. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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