Föhrenbergkreis Finanzwirtschaft

Unkonventionelle Lösungen für eine zukunftsfähige Gesellschaft

Posts Tagged ‘Jobs’

Automation Isn’t Killing Jobs, Study Says, But May Be Keeping Income in Check

Posted by hkarner - 11. März 2018

Date: 10-03-2018
Source: The Wall Street Journal

New research finds workers are getting a smaller slice of an expanding economy

Robotic arms weld car frames in a Japanese auto factory in December.
Employment in transportation equipment manufacturing was nearly unchanged between 1970 and 2007, but the sector became far more productive.

A new study rebuts the notion that automation is eliminating jobs broadly in the economy, but does find technological advancement doesn’t reward workers much with added income.

Over the previous five decades, automation hasn’t reduced the number of jobs available in 18 advanced economies, including the U.S.–in fact, it helped increase total employment, finds a new paper by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s David Autor and Utrecht University’s Anna Salomons and released Thursday by the Brookings Institution.

But the economists’ paper also found that automation, and the productivity enhancements that it drives, has resulted in laborers taking home a smaller slice of an expanding economic pie. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Why governments have overestimated the economic returns of higher education

Posted by hkarner - 4. März 2018

Date: 02-03-2018
Source: The Economist

Earning a degree is about signalling, and not just learning

AUTOMATION and globalisation have brought drastic changes to Western labour markets. Middle-skilled jobs are disappearing fast. In America, wages for blue-collar workers have been largely stagnant since the 1970s, whereas those for university graduates have soared. Silicon Valley types frequently warn that advances in technology, especially in artificial intelligence, will be devastating for low-skilled workers. One prominent study, by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne of Oxford University, estimated that 47% of jobs in America could be automated over the next two decades. The spectre of mass unemployment, along with increasing levels of income equality, has led many policymakers to see investment in university as crucial for economic prosperity.

Governments have plenty of reason to be bullish about higher education. Perhaps the best piece of evidence they have of the wisdom of investing more in universities is the graduate-wage premium—the difference in wages between those with university degrees and those without. In their book “The Race between Education and Technology”, Claudia Goldin and Lawrence Katz of Harvard University point out that this premium fell during the first half of the 20th century in America as universities expanded enrolment, but started rising sharply around 1980. Although the premium has started to level off in recent years, the fact that university graduates still make around 70% more than non-graduates suggests that demand for skilled workers still far exceeds supply. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Digitalisierung bedroht 3,4 Millionen Jobs

Posted by hkarner - 3. Februar 2018

Date: 02-02-2018
Source: SPIEGEL

Bis 2022 könnte die Digitalisierung in Deutschland etwa 3,4 Millionen Arbeitsplätze kosten, das wäre jede zehnte Stelle. Das berichtet die „FAZ“. Jedes vierte Unternehmen sieht sogar seine Existenz bedroht.

Roboter arbeiten an einer Auto-Karosserie

Die deutsche Wirtschaft boomt, die Arbeitslosenquote ist auf ein Rekordtief gefallen und Unternehmen suchen händeringend nach Arbeitskräften. Das könnte sich einem Medienbericht zufolge bald ändern. In den kommenden fünf Jahren könnte die Digitalisierung in Deutschland 3,4 Millionen Stellen vernichten. Das geht aus einer Umfrage des IT-Verbands Bitkom hervor, die der „Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung“ vorliegt.

Angesichts von aktuell knapp 33 Millionen sozialversicherungspflichtig Beschäftigten entspräche das mehr als jeder zehnten Stelle. Für die Umfrage wurden 500 deutsche Unternehmen mit mehr als 20 Mitarbeitern befragt. Demnach sieht sich jedes vierte Unternehmen durch die Digitalisierung sogar ganz in seiner Existenz bedroht.

Bitkom-Präsident Achim Berg kritisiert vor diesem Hintergrund die gegenwärtigen Koalitionsverhandlungen. Arzthonorare, Rentenniveau, Soli-Abschmelzung – „seltsam entrückt“ komme ihm das alles vor, sagte er der „FAZ“. Die Politik betreibe zum Thema Digitalisierung bislang nicht mehr als „Buzzword-Bingo“. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Every study we could find on what automation will do to jobs, in one chart

Posted by hkarner - 27. Januar 2018

 Who protects us from „such“ „experts“? (hfk)

Date: 26-01-2018
Source: Technology Review

There are about as many opinions as there are experts.

You’ve seen the headlines: “Robots Will Destroy Our Jobs—and We’re Not Ready for It.” “You Will Lose Your Job to a Robot—and Sooner Than You Think.” “Robots May Steal as Many as 800 Million Jobs in the Next 13 Years.”

Such stories are tempting to take at face value. Who wouldn’t want to know if their livelihood, or that of their children, will soon be in jeopardy?

Here’s the problem: the findings cited emanate from a wide array of studies released by companies, think tanks, and research institutions. And their prognostications are all over the map. They’re coming so fast and thick, in fact, that we here at MIT Technology Review decided to start keeping tabs on all the numbers different groups have come up with about predicted job losses (and some gains) at the hands of automation, robots, and AI. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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The Stupid Economy

Posted by hkarner - 23. Januar 2018

Harold James is Professor of History and International Affairs at Princeton University and a senior fellow at the Center for International Governance Innovation. A specialist on German economic history and on globalization, he is a co-author of the new book The Euro and The Battle of Ideas, and the author of The Creation and Destruction of Value: The Globalization Cycle, Krupp: A History of the Legendary German Firm, and Making the European Monetary Union.

Advances in automation and artificial intelligence already pose a clear threat to countless occupations, just as the technologies of the Industrial Revolution did for many forms of manual labor in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. But this time, it is not just our jobs that are in danger.

PRINCETON – Most discussions about the march of robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) have understandably concentrated on fears of massive job losses. But the implications of these technologies are actually far more terrifying. We have been brought to the brink of an alarming evolutionary transformation, not just of human capacities, but of the individual self.

History provides only a partial guide for the uncertain future we face. What we know from the first Industrial Revolution is that new technologies can fundamentally alter humans and other species. The key to this process, according to Cambridge University’s Tony Wrigley, the great historian of the era, was the replacement of human- and animal-driven mechanical energy by more productive forms, such as coal and other fossil fuels. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Two Myths About Automation

Posted by hkarner - 13. Dezember 2017

Barry Eichengreen is Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, and a former senior policy adviser at the International Monetary Fund. His latest book is Hall of Mirrors:The Great Depression, the Great Recession, and the Uses – and Misuses – of History.

While many people believe that technological progress and job destruction are accelerating dramatically, there is no evidence of either trend. In reality, total factor productivity, the best summary measure of the pace of technical change, has been stagnating since 2005 in the US and across the advanced-country world.

BERKELEY – Robots, machine learning, and artificial intelligence promise to change fundamentally the nature of work. Everyone knows this. Or at least they think they do.

Specifically, they think they know two things. First, more jobs than ever are threatened. “Forrester Predicts that AI-enabled Automation will Eliminate 9% of US Jobs in 2018,” declares one headline. “McKinsey: One-third of US workers could be jobless by 2030 due to automation,” seconds another.

Reports like these leave the impression that technological progress and job destruction are accelerating dramatically. But there is no evidence of either trend. In reality, total factor productivity, the best summary measure of the pace of technical change, has been stagnating since 2005 in the United States and across the advanced-country world.

Moreover, as the economist Timothy Taylor recently pointed out, the rate of change of the occupational structure, defined as the absolute value of jobs added in growing occupations and jobs lost in declining occupations, has been slowing, not accelerating, since the 1980s. This is not to deny that the occupational structure is changing. But it calls into question the widely held view that the pace of change is quickening.

The second thing everyone thinks they know is that previously safe jobs are now at risk. Once upon a time, it was possible to argue that robots would displace workers engaged in routine tasks, but not the highly skilled and educated – not the doctors, lawyers and, dare one say, professors. In particular, machines, it was said, are not capable of tasks in which empathy, compassion, intuition, interpersonal interaction, and communication are central.

Now, however, these distinctions are breaking down. Amazon’s Alexa can communicate. Crowd-sourcing, together with one’s digital history, can intuit buying habits. Artificial intelligence can be used to read x-rays and diagnose medical conditions. As a result, all jobs, even those of doctors, lawyers, and professors, are being transformed.

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Automatic Job Storm Coming

Posted by hkarner - 10. Dezember 2017

The monthly jobs report isn’t like that. Yes, any single month doesn’t tell us much. Yes, the Labor Department’s methodology has some flaws, both major and minor. But imperfect as it is, the jobs report is our best look at the economy’s pulse. Jobs matter in a visceral way to almost all of us, as you know well if you’ve ever lost one. Almost any survey that asked questions around employment would reveal the angst that many Americans feel about the possibility of losing their jobs.

Right now, automation tops the list of things that might threaten our jobs. Artificial intelligence and robotics technology are rapidly learning to do what human workers do, but better, faster, and cheaper.

I’ve use the following chart before, but it’s a compelling illustration of how technology is reducing employment. It shows the rising rig count in the oil patch since mid-2016 – and yet the number of workers on those rigs is actually still falling. This is the impact of a new robot called an iron roughneck: Tasks that used to require 20 people now need only five. And the iron roughneck is not even that widely deployed in the oil and gas industry – the trend will hit hard in the coming decade. Roughneck jobs are relatively high-paying; it takes a great deal of training and skill to be able to do them. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Forget Robots: Bad Public Policies Could Be Bigger Job Killers

Posted by hkarner - 30. November 2017

Date: 29-11-2017
Source: The Wall Street Journal

Study stresses need for businesses, governments to prudently manage disruption created by automation

Automation could be a huge boon to the world’s workers—but only if governments and businesses prudently manage the disruption it creates.

As many as 375 million workers around the world will need to find new occupations or lose their livelihood to automation by 2030, the McKinsey Global Institute estimates in a new report. It isn’t impossible for up to 14% of the global workforce to retrain and refocus, but it requires planning and the investment of will and resources, says Susan Lund, a principal at the Institute.

“‘Will there be enough jobs?’ is not the right question,” she says. “The question is, what are we going to do to manage the transition for people who do lose their jobs?” The choices that policy makers and business leaders make about how to support displaced workers, invest in education and training, and fund job-creating projects in areas such as infrastructure and energy will all affect the labor market, she says. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Jobs Lost, Jobs Gained

Posted by hkarner - 29. November 2017

Absolutely essential to understand ! (hfk)

Automation is not a new phenomenon, and fears about its transformation of the workplace and effects on employment date back centuries, even before the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries. In the 1960s, US President Lyndon Johnson empaneled a “National Commission on Technology, Automation, and Economic Progress.” Among its conclusions was “the basic fact that technology destroys jobs, but not work.”* Fast forward and rapid recent advances in automation technologies, including artificial intelligence, autonomous systems, and robotics are now raising the fears anew—and with new urgency.

In our January 2017 report on automation, A future that works: Automation, employment, and productivity, we analyzed the automation potential of the global economy, the timelines over which the phenomenon could play out, and the powerful productivity boost that
automation adoption could deliver. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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The Changing Face of Work in India

Posted by hkarner - 18. Juli 2017

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