Föhrenbergkreis Finanzwirtschaft

Unkonventionelle Lösungen für eine zukunftsfähige Gesellschaft

Posts Tagged ‘Education’

WHY THE ‚POORLY EDUCATED‘ LOVE DONALD TRUMP BACK

Posted by hkarner - 27. November 2016

Date: 26-11-2016
Source: NewsWeek

Less educated voters are more likely to back populist parties in Europe, too.

Tweeters worried Donald Trump may divide families at Thanksgiving

Donald Trump spent much of his election campaign raging against groups he doesn’t like; Muslims, the media, Mexicans and the rest. But there’s at least one group he’s a fan of. “I love the poorly educated!” the president-elect to be declared after pulling off a victory in the Nevada caucus of the Republican primary.

Now, an analysis of his shock election victory shows the feeling was mutual.

It was “education, not income,” that was the strongest predictor of a vote for Trump, according to the polling analyst Nate Silver. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Soft Skills Give Workers a Big Edge. It’s Time to Start Focusing on Them in School, Report Says

Posted by hkarner - 6. Oktober 2016

Date: 05-10-2016
Source: The Wall Street Journal

Students with strong soft skills have higher earnings and are more likely to graduate college and work full-time

When it comes to teaching soft skills, the earlier the better, says a new report from the Hamilton Project.

Teaching and improving soft skills—such as conscientiousness, adaptability and perseverance—can provide huge economic gains for young people, and should receive more attention from education policy makers, according to a new report from the Hamilton Project.

Soft skills, also known as noncognitive skills or foundational skills, are increasingly in demand in today’s economy. More Americans work in service-sector jobs that require human interaction, and automation and technology are replacing jobs involving routine tasks. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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China’s Higher-Education Glut

Posted by hkarner - 18. August 2016

Photo of Edoardo Campanella

Edoardo Campanella

Edoardo Campanella is a eurozone economist at UniCredit and Junior Fellow at the Aspen Institute.

AUG 17, 2016, Project Syndicate

MILAN – China has always valued education, reflecting its Confucian tradition, according to which one must excel scholastically to achieve high professional and social status. But today, the country is stricken with what some call “education fever,” as middle-class Chinese parents demand more schooling for their children, and as young people seek ways to avoid the drudgery of factory life.

China’s government, by emphasizing the need for a better-educated workforce to compete with the West, is fueling this trend. This year alone, China produced 7.65 million university graduates – a historic high – and around nine million high school students took the gaokao, China’s general university admission exam. These are staggering figures, even for a country with a billion people and a tertiary-education enrollment rate that is one-third that of advanced economies. To put the trend in perspective, China graduated fewer than two million people from college in 1999, and the pass rate for the gaokao was only 40%, half of what it is today. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Financing Health and Education for All

Posted by hkarner - 1. Juni 2016

Photo of Jeffrey D. Sachs

Jeffrey D. Sachs

Jeffrey D. Sachs, Professor of Sustainable Development, Professor of Health Policy and Management, and Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, is also Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network. His books include The End of Poverty, Common Wealth, and, most recently, The Age of Sustainable Development.

MAY 31, 2016, Project Syndicate

NEW YORK – In 2015, around 5.9 million children under the age of five, almost all in developing countries, died from easily preventable or treatable causes. And up to 200 million young children and adolescents do not attend primary or secondary school, owing to poverty, including 110 million through the lower-secondary level, according to a recent estimate. In both cases, massive suffering could be ended with a modest amount of global funding.

Children in poor countries die from causes – such as unsafe childbirth, vaccine-preventable diseases, infections such as malaria for which low-cost treatments exist, and nutritional deficiencies – that have been almost totally eliminated in the rich countries. In a moral world, we would devote our utmost effort to end such deaths. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Higher Education for Syria

Posted by hkarner - 25. Februar 2016

Photo of John Shattuck

John Shattuck

John Shattuck, former Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor and former US Ambassador to the Czech Republic, is President and Rector of Central European University.

Photo of Robert Templer

Robert Templer

Robert Templer is Director of the CEU School of Public Policy’s Center for Conflict, Negotiation, and Recovery.

FEB 24, 2016, Project Syndicate

BUDAPEST – Educating refugee children was high on the agenda when donors met in London in early February for a record-setting day of fundraising for Syria. As Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai explained, “Losing this generation is a cost the world cannot [afford].”

It is important to remember, however, that Syria’s school-age children are not the only generation at risk of being lost. The Institute of International Education (IIE) estimates that as many as 450,000 of the more than four million Syrian refugees in the Middle East and North Africa are 18-22 years old, and that approximately 100,000 of them are qualified for university. They, too, are in desperate need of opportunities to further their studies.

Peace will eventually come to Syria. It is impossible to know exactly when, but all wars end. One day, the guns will fall silent, and the country will begin to rebuild. As we have learned from the dramatic failures in Iraq and Afghanistan, reconstruction will be successful only if Syrians – not outsiders – lead the effort. With millions of Syrians seeking refuge abroad, the country will face a desperate shortfall of skilled, educated workers just when it needs them most. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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The World is Getting Better!

Posted by hkarner - 31. Dezember 2015

… but we are being betrayed by the media, which believe to need living of bad news! (hfk)

So: let’s be optimisitic! A Happy New Year!

Mohamed Nagdy and Max Roser (2015) – ‘Optimism & Pessimism’. Published online at OurWorldInData.org. Retrieved from: http://ourworldindata.org/data/culture-values-and-society/optimism-pessimism/ 

The world is improving in almost every measurable way; fewer people are dying of disease, conflict and famine; more of us are receiving a basic education; the world is becoming more democratic; we live longer and lead healthier lives. So why is that we, mostly in the developed world, are pessimistic about our collective future?

Things Are Getting Better

With all the negative news stories and sensationalism that exists in the media it may be hard to believe things are improving. These events can be contextualised as short-term fluctuations in an otherwise positive global trend. Quantifying this progress and identifying its causes will help researchers develop successful strategies to combat the world’s problems. Below is a selection of graphs showing just how much progress has been made over the centuries. More examples can be found on http://ourworldindata.org/data/.

Absolute number of people living in extreme poverty, 1820-2011 – Max Roser13

Roser Poverty2

Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Education in an Uncertain World

Posted by hkarner - 16. Dezember 2015

Photo of Andreas Schleicher

Andreas Schleicher

Andreas Schleicher is Director for Education and Skills and Special Advisor on Education Policy to the OECD’s Secretary-General.

DEC 16, 2015, Project Syndicate

PARIS – Until the Industrial Revolution, neither formal education nor advances in technology made much of a difference for the vast majority of people. But as technological progress accelerated, education failed to keep pace, leaving vast numbers of people struggling to adapt to a rapidly changing world and contributing to widespread suffering.

It took a century for public policy to respond with an effort to provide universal access to schooling. In recent decades, remarkable strides have been made toward realizing that ambition worldwide. But in an era when technological innovation is once again outpacing education, the effort to provide everybody with an opportunity to learn must not only be redoubled; it must also be retooled for an increasingly unstable and volatile world. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Weg mit diesem Gamsbartföderalismus

Posted by hkarner - 12. November 2015

12.11.2015 | 18:24 | Josef Urschitz (Die Presse)urschitz

Kolumne Der Streit um die Parteibüchelhoheit über die Schulen wirft wieder einmal ein grelles Schlaglicht auf den gewachsenen Verwaltungsirrsinn im Land. Da gehören jetzt viele gewachsene Austriaka auf den Prüfstand – ohne Tabus.

Die Bildungsreform ist jetzt im Wesentlichen also dort angekommen, wo Reformen in diesem Land immer enden: Es geht primär nicht mehr um Inhalte, sondern hauptsächlich darum, ob die Hoheit über die Parteibüchel-Stellenbesetzungen beim Bund oder bei den Ländern liegen sollen. Die Reform, das kann man ruhig sagen, ist damit schon vor ihrem Inkrafttreten gescheitert.

Dabei hätte gerade das Schulwesen neben der notwendigen bildungspolitischen Weichenstellung eine wirklich radikale Verwaltungsreform dringend nötig. Nirgendwo lässt sich der verwaltungstechnische Irrsinn und die Ineffizienz des alpenländischen Gamsbartföderalismus besser (und erschreckender) darstellen, als in den Schulverwaltungsorganigrammen, die der Rechnungshof regelmäßig veröffentlicht. Kumuliert in der berühmt gewordenen wirren Zeichnung, die die 40 (!) Kompetenzlinien darstellen, entlang der fünf Abteilungen aus zwei Ministerien und jeweils mehrere Abteilungen aus neun Landesregierungen gemeinsam (oder eher gegeneinander) ein paar tausend Schüler der landwirtschaftliche Fachschulen verwalten. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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America’s Education Bubble

Posted by hkarner - 10. November 2015

Photo of Mohamed A. El-Erian

Mohamed A. El-Erian

Mohamed A. El-Erian, Chief Economic Adviser at Allianz and a member of its International Executive Committee, is Chairman of US President Barack Obama’s Global Development Council. He previously served as CEO and co-Chief Investment Officer of PIMCO. He was named one of Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers in 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012. His book When Markets Collide was the Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Book of the Year and was named a best book of 2008 by The Economist.

NOV 9, 2015, Project Syndicate

SAN FRANCISCO – One of the fundamental purposes of government is to advance important public goods. But, if not handled carefully, the pursuit of significant social goals can have unfortunate economic and financial consequences, sometimes even leading to systemic disruptions that undermine more than just the goals themselves.

This happened a decade ago in the United States, with the effort to expand home ownership. It has been playing out more recently in China, following an initiative to broaden stock-market participation. And it could happen again in the US, this time as the result of an attempt to improve access to funding for higher education. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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What’s Wrong With Labor Markets?

Posted by hkarner - 27. Oktober 2015

Photo of Mauro F. Guillén

Mauro F. Guillén

Mauro F. Guillén is Director of the Lauder Institute at the Wharton School.

OCT 26, 2015, Project Syndicate

PHILADELPHIA – Around the world, labor markets are in disarray. Unemployment is high in many countries, especially among the young. At the same time, many companies report having trouble finding qualified workers. Record numbers of people are going into retirement, but many would prefer to work, at least part-time. Information technology has displaced workers even as it has created new jobs.

These conflicting signals and trends are a symptom of a series of fundamental mismatches between what employers need and the talents of those they would like to hire. There have never been so many highly educated people in the world; yet the crises in Europe, the slow recovery in the United States, and the rise of emerging economies are revealing previously hidden flaws in the labor market. Addressing them will require a broad range of policy interventions. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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