Föhrenbergkreis Finanzwirtschaft

Unkonventionelle Lösungen für eine zukunftsfähige Gesellschaft

Posts Tagged ‘Education’

Retraining low-skilled workers

Posted by hkarner - 15. Januar 2017

Date: 12-01-2017
Source: The Economist

Systems for continuous reskilling threaten to buttress inequality

IMAGINE YOU ARE a 45-year-old long-distance lorry driver. You never enjoyed school and left as soon as you could, with a smattering of qualifications and no great love of learning. The job is tiring and solitary, but it does at least seem to offer decent job security: driver shortages are a perennial complaint in the industry, and the average age of the workforce is high (48 in Britain), so the shortfalls are likely to get worse. America’s Bureau of Labour Statistics (BLS) says there were 1.8m truckers in 2014 and expects a 5% rise in their number by 2024. “As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving,” predicts the BLS website, chirpily.

But the future might unfold very differently. For all the excitement over self-driving passenger cars, the freight industry is likely to adopt autonomous vehicles even faster. And according to a report in 2014 by Morgan Stanley, a bank, full automation might reduce the pool of American truck drivers by two-thirds. Those projections came hedged with caveats, and rightly so. The pace of adoption may be slowed by regulation. Drivers may still be needed to deal with unforeseen problems; if such jobs require more technical knowledge, they may even pay better. Employment in other sectors may grow as freight costs come down. But there is a chance that in the not too distant future a very large number of truckers will find themselves redundant. The implications are immense. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Alternative providers of education must solve the problems of cost and credentials

Posted by hkarner - 14. Januar 2017

Date: 12-01-2017
Source: The Economist
Subject: Established education providers v new contenders

THE HYPE OVER MOOCs peaked in 2012. Salman Khan, an investment analyst who had begun teaching bite-sized lessons to his cousin in New Orleans over the internet and turned that activity into a wildly popular educational resource called the Khan Academy, was splashed on the cover of Forbes. Sebastian Thrun, the founder of another MOOC called Udacity, predicted in an interview in Wired magazine that within 50 years the number of universities would collapse to just ten worldwide. The New York Times declared it the year of the MOOC.

The sheer numbers of people flocking to some of the initial courses seemed to suggest that an entirely new model of open-access, free university education was within reach. Now MOOC sceptics are more numerous than believers. Although lots of people still sign up, drop-out rates are sky-high.

moocNonetheless, the MOOCs are on to something. Education, like health care, is a complex and fragmented industry, which makes it hard to gain scale. Despite those drop-out rates, the MOOCs have shown it can be done quickly and comparatively cheaply. The Khan Academy has 14m-15m users who conduct at least one learning activity with it each month; Coursera has 22m registered learners. Those numbers are only going to grow. FutureLearn, a MOOC owned by Britain’s Open University, has big plans. Oxford University announced in November that it would be producing its first MOOC on the edX platform. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Equipping people to stay ahead of technological change

Posted by hkarner - 12. Januar 2017

Date: 12-01-2017
Source: The Economist
Subject: Learning and earning

It is easy to say that people need to keep learning throughout their careers. The practicalities are daunting

WHEN education fails to keep pace with technology, the result is inequality.
Without the skills to stay useful as innovations arrive, workers suffer—and if enough of them fall behind, society starts to fall apart. That fundamental insight seized reformers in the Industrial Revolution, heralding state-funded universal schooling. Later, automation in factories and offices called forth a surge in college graduates. The combination of education and innovation, spread over decades, led to a remarkable flowering of prosperity.

Today robotics and artificial intelligence call for another education revolution. This time, however, working lives are so lengthy and so fast-changing that simply cramming more schooling in at the start is not enough. People must also be able to acquire new skills throughout their careers. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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What the world can learn from the latest PISA test results

Posted by hkarner - 10. Dezember 2016

Date: 10-12-2016
Source: The Economist

Reforming education is slow and hard, but eminently possible

FOOTBALL fans must wait four years between World Cups. Education nerds get their fill of global competition every three. The sixth Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a test of the science, maths and reading skills of 15-year-olds from across the world, was published by the OECD club of mainly rich countries on December 6th. Its results have telling lessons for policymakers worldwide.

pisa1Some 540,000 pupils in 72 countries or regions—each of whom had finished at least six years of school—sat similar tests last year. The OECD then crunched the results into a standardised scale (see chart 1). In the OECD the average result for each subject is about 490 points. Scoring 30 points above that is roughly akin to completing an extra year of schooling.

Singapore, the consistently high-achiever in PISA, does even better: it is now the top-performing country in each subject area. The average pupil’s maths score of 564 suggests Singaporean teens are roughly three years ahead of their American peers, with a tally of 470.

Other East Asian countries also score highly across most domains, as they have done since PISA was launched 15 years ago. Japan and South Korea have above-average results in science and maths, as do cities such as Hong Kong and Macau, both autonomous territories of China, and Taipei, the capital of Taiwan. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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WHY THE ‚POORLY EDUCATED‘ LOVE DONALD TRUMP BACK

Posted by hkarner - 27. November 2016

Date: 26-11-2016
Source: NewsWeek

Less educated voters are more likely to back populist parties in Europe, too.

Tweeters worried Donald Trump may divide families at Thanksgiving

Donald Trump spent much of his election campaign raging against groups he doesn’t like; Muslims, the media, Mexicans and the rest. But there’s at least one group he’s a fan of. “I love the poorly educated!” the president-elect to be declared after pulling off a victory in the Nevada caucus of the Republican primary.

Now, an analysis of his shock election victory shows the feeling was mutual.

It was “education, not income,” that was the strongest predictor of a vote for Trump, according to the polling analyst Nate Silver. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Soft Skills Give Workers a Big Edge. It’s Time to Start Focusing on Them in School, Report Says

Posted by hkarner - 6. Oktober 2016

Date: 05-10-2016
Source: The Wall Street Journal

Students with strong soft skills have higher earnings and are more likely to graduate college and work full-time

When it comes to teaching soft skills, the earlier the better, says a new report from the Hamilton Project.

Teaching and improving soft skills—such as conscientiousness, adaptability and perseverance—can provide huge economic gains for young people, and should receive more attention from education policy makers, according to a new report from the Hamilton Project.

Soft skills, also known as noncognitive skills or foundational skills, are increasingly in demand in today’s economy. More Americans work in service-sector jobs that require human interaction, and automation and technology are replacing jobs involving routine tasks. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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China’s Higher-Education Glut

Posted by hkarner - 18. August 2016

Photo of Edoardo Campanella

Edoardo Campanella

Edoardo Campanella is a eurozone economist at UniCredit and Junior Fellow at the Aspen Institute.

AUG 17, 2016, Project Syndicate

MILAN – China has always valued education, reflecting its Confucian tradition, according to which one must excel scholastically to achieve high professional and social status. But today, the country is stricken with what some call “education fever,” as middle-class Chinese parents demand more schooling for their children, and as young people seek ways to avoid the drudgery of factory life.

China’s government, by emphasizing the need for a better-educated workforce to compete with the West, is fueling this trend. This year alone, China produced 7.65 million university graduates – a historic high – and around nine million high school students took the gaokao, China’s general university admission exam. These are staggering figures, even for a country with a billion people and a tertiary-education enrollment rate that is one-third that of advanced economies. To put the trend in perspective, China graduated fewer than two million people from college in 1999, and the pass rate for the gaokao was only 40%, half of what it is today. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Financing Health and Education for All

Posted by hkarner - 1. Juni 2016

Photo of Jeffrey D. Sachs

Jeffrey D. Sachs

Jeffrey D. Sachs, Professor of Sustainable Development, Professor of Health Policy and Management, and Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, is also Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network. His books include The End of Poverty, Common Wealth, and, most recently, The Age of Sustainable Development.

MAY 31, 2016, Project Syndicate

NEW YORK – In 2015, around 5.9 million children under the age of five, almost all in developing countries, died from easily preventable or treatable causes. And up to 200 million young children and adolescents do not attend primary or secondary school, owing to poverty, including 110 million through the lower-secondary level, according to a recent estimate. In both cases, massive suffering could be ended with a modest amount of global funding.

Children in poor countries die from causes – such as unsafe childbirth, vaccine-preventable diseases, infections such as malaria for which low-cost treatments exist, and nutritional deficiencies – that have been almost totally eliminated in the rich countries. In a moral world, we would devote our utmost effort to end such deaths. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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Higher Education for Syria

Posted by hkarner - 25. Februar 2016

Photo of John Shattuck

John Shattuck

John Shattuck, former Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor and former US Ambassador to the Czech Republic, is President and Rector of Central European University.

Photo of Robert Templer

Robert Templer

Robert Templer is Director of the CEU School of Public Policy’s Center for Conflict, Negotiation, and Recovery.

FEB 24, 2016, Project Syndicate

BUDAPEST – Educating refugee children was high on the agenda when donors met in London in early February for a record-setting day of fundraising for Syria. As Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai explained, “Losing this generation is a cost the world cannot [afford].”

It is important to remember, however, that Syria’s school-age children are not the only generation at risk of being lost. The Institute of International Education (IIE) estimates that as many as 450,000 of the more than four million Syrian refugees in the Middle East and North Africa are 18-22 years old, and that approximately 100,000 of them are qualified for university. They, too, are in desperate need of opportunities to further their studies.

Peace will eventually come to Syria. It is impossible to know exactly when, but all wars end. One day, the guns will fall silent, and the country will begin to rebuild. As we have learned from the dramatic failures in Iraq and Afghanistan, reconstruction will be successful only if Syrians – not outsiders – lead the effort. With millions of Syrians seeking refuge abroad, the country will face a desperate shortfall of skilled, educated workers just when it needs them most. Den Rest des Beitrags lesen »

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The World is Getting Better!

Posted by hkarner - 31. Dezember 2015

… but we are being betrayed by the media, which believe to need living of bad news! (hfk)

So: let’s be optimisitic! A Happy New Year!

Mohamed Nagdy and Max Roser (2015) – ‘Optimism & Pessimism’. Published online at OurWorldInData.org. Retrieved from: http://ourworldindata.org/data/culture-values-and-society/optimism-pessimism/ 

The world is improving in almost every measurable way; fewer people are dying of disease, conflict and famine; more of us are receiving a basic education; the world is becoming more democratic; we live longer and lead healthier lives. So why is that we, mostly in the developed world, are pessimistic about our collective future?

Things Are Getting Better

With all the negative news stories and sensationalism that exists in the media it may be hard to believe things are improving. These events can be contextualised as short-term fluctuations in an otherwise positive global trend. Quantifying this progress and identifying its causes will help researchers develop successful strategies to combat the world’s problems. Below is a selection of graphs showing just how much progress has been made over the centuries. More examples can be found on http://ourworldindata.org/data/.

Absolute number of people living in extreme poverty, 1820-2011 – Max Roser13

Roser Poverty2

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